Tag Archives: Moses

Thou Shalt Not Raise a False Report

In Exodus 20 of the Holy Scriptures is listed what is referred to as “The Ten Commandments.” These commandments given to Moses from God on Mt. Sinai include, “Thou shalt not kill;” “Thou shalt not steal;” “Thou shalt not bear false witness.” The list of commandments does not end with the ten most familiar commandments of the chapter, but continue on throughout the rest of the Book of Exodus, the Books of Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy, containing over 600 laws in all given by God to be obeyed.

As The LORD continued giving Moses in detail HIS LAW that was to be followed in addition to the Ten Commandments, in the very first verse of Exodus 23 is written, “Thou shalt not raise a false report.” A true witness among the people is what must be maintained to have a civil society for mankind to live in peace and experience the blessings of God. The verse goes on to say, “Put not thine hand with the wicked to be an unrighteous witness.” It is Satan who is the father of lies and false reports, and those who follow him do his bidding (John 8:44). The Apostle Paul wrote of those who are deceitful, “Their throat is an open sepulchre; with their tongues they have used deceit; the poison of asps is under their lips,” (Romans 3:13).

Just a few verses following the command, “Thou shalt not raise a false report,” God admonished Moses in the giving of His Law that the people were to “Keep thee far from a false matter,” (Exodus 23:7). Whenever and wherever a falsehood rears its ugly head, God commands man to distance himself from it and not to become a part of it. It is Satan’s desire to deceive the people through falsehoods; it is God’s desire to bring eternal salvation and right living to the people through the TRUTH of His Word (John 17:17).

DELIVERANCE

As Moses stood before the burning bush located on the backside of the desert near Mt. Horeb in the Sinai Peninsula, he was told by God the cries of His people under bondage in Egypt had reached His ear. He had seen their affliction; He knew of their sorrows. God told Moses He observed the oppression the Children of Israel were under and He was come to deliver them out of the hand of the Egyptian Pharaoh and their cruel taskmasters, and bring them into a land that flowed with milk and honey (Exodus 3).

A millennia later the Jewish people who were living in exile in Persia under King Ahasuerus during the Babylonian Captivity found themselves decreed to be destroyed throughout the entire province by the hand of wicked Haman on the thirteenth day of the month Adar (March). The Persian people were to rise up and destroy “all Jews, both young and old, little children and women, in one day.” The cry of God’s people once again reached His ear and deliverance was orchestrated by the hand of God through the efforts of Queen Esther and her cousin, Mordecai, by a subsequent decree issued in King Ahasuerus’ name allowing the Jews to defend themselves on that fateful day (Esther 3:8-4:3; 8:1-9:22).

The deliverance of God’s people from both the Egyptians and the Persians caused great rejoicing as evidenced by Moses’ song of praise to God in Exodus 15 and the celebration of the Feast of Purim which continues to this day found in Esther chapter nine. But both of those events were temporary deliverances, for each and every person longs for a permanent deliverance and a peace that endures. As Mordecai sent letters to every village and town “both nigh and far” establishing the days of rejoicing to be observed yearly, the LORD promises “Peace, peace to him that is far off, and to him that is near,” (Isaiah 57:18-19). The Apostle Paul wrote to the Church at Ephesus in Asia Minor of Christ being our Peace, “But now in Christ Jesus ye who sometimes were far off are made nigh by the blood of Christ… that He might reconcile both unto God in one body by the cross… came and preached peace to you which were afar off, and to them that were nigh,” (Ephesians 2:13-18). Christ has become our eternal Deliverance through the shedding of His blood for our sin, “For in Him we live, and move, and have our being,” (Acts 17:28).

JESUS, Our High Priest

In the wilderness God gave Moses detailed instructions on building the Tabernacle. Once settled in the Promised Land, King David desired to replace the Tabernacle tent with a permanent structure. God allowed David’s son, Solomon, to build the magnificent Temple high on a hill overlooking the City of Jerusalem. From the time of Moses until Jesus’ death on the cross, the blood of bulls and goats was what God required to cover sin, but upon the shedding of Jesus’ blood on the cross He became our High Priest, obtaining eternal redemption for us through His blood.

The Book of Leviticus outlines every aspect of God’s instructions to Moses, not only for the construction of the Tabernacle but also its furnishings and function. The high priest was to be appointed from the Levitical lineage of Moses’ brother, Aaron, and was tasked with entering once each year to seek forgiveness for himself and the sins of the people into the partitioned Holy of Holies where the Ark of the Covenant resided hidden from the people. With the deaths of the high priests throughout the centuries, others were appointed to replace them, that is, until Jesus became the final and Eternal High Priest.

The Apostle Paul writes in the Book of Hebrews of Jesus becoming the Everlasting High Priest upon His death, burial and resurrection. In Hebrews 9:11-12 Paul explains, “But Christ being come an high priest of good things to come, by a greater and more perfect tabernacle, not made with hands, that is to say, not of this building; Neither by the blood of goats and calves, but by His own blood He entered in ONCE into the holy place.” As the Eternal High Priest, He alone became the Mediator between God and man. At His death the veil in the Temple separating the Holy of Holies from the people was rent in two from top to bottom forever giving man access to the Father through Jesus, His Son, “For Christ is not entered into the holy places made with hands, which are the figures of the true; but into Heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God for us,” (Hebrews 9:24).

As the High Priest of our salvation, Jesus came into the world to put away sin by the sacrifice of Himself,” breaking down the middle wall of partition between God and man, and “after He had offered ONE sacrifice for sins FOR EVER, sat down on the right hand of God,” ever making intercession for us (Hebrews 9:26; 10:12; Ephesians 2:13,14; Romans 8:34).

Hope Thou in GOD

The world seems hopeless, and it is. There are wars and rumors of wars. There are earthquakes, floods, and volcanic eruptions. There is violence and death, disease and sickness, hatred and jealousy; fathers against sons, mothers against daughters, children against parents (Micah 7:6; Luke 12:53). The world seems out of control, and it is. But there is Light in the midst of darkness, Life in the midst of death, Hope in the midst of hopelessness.

David’s life seemed totally hopeless as he hid in caves and tried to keep one step ahead of King Saul’s pursuit to kill him. It was because of Saul’s anger and jealousy David had many a sleepness night. Not knowing what the future might hold for him, David in his loneliest hour quizzed himself, “Why art thou cast down , O my soul? and why art thou disquieted in me?” Suddenly the answer to overcoming his troubled soul came to him, “Hope thou in God,” (Psalm 42:5).

Adam hoped in God to send a Redeemer – Genesis 3:15

Abraham hoped in God to father a nation – Genesis 17

Moses hoped in God to lead His people – Exodus 3-4

Joshua hoped in God to conquer the Promised Land – Joshua 1

Nehemiah hoped in God to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem – Nehemiah 4-6

Isaiah hoped in God to be His witness – Isaiah 6

Martha hoped in God for life after death – John 11

Peter hoped in God for forgiveness in denying Christ – John 21

Paul hoped in God to deliver him safely to Rome – Acts 27

 “Be of good courage, and He shall strengthen your heart,    

All ye that hope in the LORD.”

Psalm 31:24

 

 

Look and Live

Once again the Children of Israel were taking the long way around. Upon the crossing of the Red Sea the LORD did not allow them to make a beeline for the Promised Land; instead He guided them to a desert place to regroup and spy out the land before entering. Because of their unbelief in conquering the land with God’s help, He caused them to wander in the wilderness for 40 long years until the unbelieving generation died off leaving their descendants to enter the land flowing with milk and honey (Numbers 13-14).

Moses had heard it all before; the people were once again complaining about a lack of food and water but this time they even loathed the manna from Heaven that had kept them alive throughout the previous decades. Not only were the men, women and children of the new generation grumbling against Moses for their present circumstance, they were murmuring against God, too. It was then the LORD sent fiery serpents among the people. Those who were sinning in rebellion against the LORD were bitten, causing “much people of Israel” to die from the venomous bites (Numbers 21).

As the people came in repentance, confessing their sin and asking Moses to “pray to the LORD that He take away the serpents from us,” the LORD instructed Moses to make a serpent of brass, set it on a pole, “and it shall come to pass, that every one that is bitten, when he looketh upon it, shall live. In John 3 Jesus told Nicodemus as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up: That whosoever believeth in Him should not perish, but have eternal life.” Jesus then spoke the words of the most familiar verse of Scripture, “For God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life, (John 3:14-16).

Look to Jesus in Repentance of Sin

And Live

                                                                                          

The Path to Revival

The Temple in Jerusalem was once again in great need of repair because of neglect. One hundred years earlier King Hezekiah had ordered the priests and Levites to sanctify themselves, sanctify the Temple, “and carry forth the filthiness out of the holy place.” Revival took place during Hezekiah’s day as worship was once again restored and the people consecrated themselves to the LORD and His commands (2 Chronicles 29-31).

King Josiah was just eight years old when he began to reign in Jerusalem following the reign of Hezekiah’s son Manasseh, followed by the reign of his grandson, Amon. As Hezekiah’s great-grandson, King Josiah at the age of sixteen began to seek after God and call for the destruction of idol worship prevalent throughout the land. The high places and groves where idol worship took place, along with their altars to Baal, their carved images and molten images used in their idolatrous worship “he brake in pieces, and made dust of them, and strowed it upon the graves of them that had sacrificed unto them.” King Josiah was very serious about destroying the sin in the land.

In the eighteenth year of King Josiah’s reign at the age of twenty-six, after purging the land of idolatry, he called for the repairing of the Temple of God in Jerusalem. As the workmen set about doing their work, the High Priest Hilkiah “found a book of the law of the LORD given by Moses.” The nation had strayed so far from God that even God’s Word had been set aside and eventually lost within the Temple confines. As Shaphan the scribe read the Book of the Law to King Josiah, the King “rent” his clothes as was custom during times of great grief, and called for all the inhabitants of Judah and Jerusalem to gather at the Temple where the King “read in their ears all the words of the book of the covenant that was found in the house of the LORD.”

At the conclusion of his reading King Josiah made a covenant before the LORD and all gathered that he would keep God’s commandments, His testimonies and statutes with all his heart and with all his soul, and would perform all the words written within the Book. He encouraged all that were present to do the same in their lives, to which they covenanted together with him to do likewise. “Josiah took away all the abominations out of all the countries that pertained to the Children of Israel, and made all that were present in Israel to serve, even to serve the LORD their God. And all his days they departed not from following the LORD, the God of their fathers,” (2 Chronicles 34).

The path to revival follows the path King Josiah took with the people who were alive during his reign. Upon repenting of sin, returning to the Word of God and remaining faithful to Him, revival will come as a nation, a people, a church return to the God of the Bible and His Word. Instead of brokenness, filthiness, and uselessness, His blood cleanses from all unrighteousness and brings restoration and revival (1 John 1:7).

NEHEMIAH – Book of “Rebuilding The Wall”

Key Verse:  Nehemiah 1:3-4, “And they said unto me…  The wall of Jerusalem also is broken down, and the gates thereof are burned with fire.  And it came to pass, when I heard these words, that I sat down and wept.”                                             

 Nehemiah Told of Jerusalem’s Condition – Chapter 1

 King Sends Nehemiah to Jerusalem – Chapter 2

 Wall Begins to be Rebuilt – Chapter 3

 Enemies Try to Stop the Work – Chapters 4-5

 Wall is Finished – Chapter 6

 Genealogy of Those Who Returned – Chapter 7

 Law of Moses Read to People – Chapter 8

 People Repent – Chapter 9

 Renewed Covenant with God – Chapter 10

 Those Who Would Live in Jerusalem – Chapter 11

 Dedication of the Wall – Chapter 12

 Law Restored in Society – Chapter 13