All Things Work Together

When the storms of life come it is comforting to know “all things,” no matter what, “work together for good” (Romans 8:28). It was the Apostle Paul who penned those words under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit; the Paul who had five times received forty stripes save one, was beaten with rods, stoned and left for dead, three times suffered shipwreck, being in the deep a night and a day. He found himself in many perils from robbers, his own countrymen, and false brethren. He experienced weariness, painfulness, hunger and thirst beyond measure (II Corinthians 11:24-27). And yet Paul was able to write with confidence, We know that all things work together for good.”

But all things do not work together for good for everyone. He continues, “All things work together for good to them that love God.” Not everyone loves God. Some only give Him a passing nod; some only seem to tolerate Him, while others completely try to ignore Him. This promise of all things working together, the good and the bad, only applies to those who love God. All others are exempt.

There is a reason “all things work together for good to them that love God;” they are being conformed to the image of His Son,” (v. 29). Those who simply ignore God or want Him totally out of their lives definitely do not want to be conformed into the image of His Son, Jesus. That is the furthest desire of their hearts and minds. They want to be conformed into their own image of themselves.

Those who truly love God have called upon the name of His Son, Jesus, to save them from their sins, repented of their sin and become a new creation in Christ. They no longer do the things they use to do, think the things they use to think. They surrender their total lives to the One Who created them, loves them and gave His life for them. Those are the ones who “know all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to His purpose… to be conformed to the image of His Son,  that He might be the Firstborn among many brethren.” Not all brethren; many brethren.

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